See below for selected media articles that feature our scientific co-founders.

Synbiotics at the Start: More research will make the synbiotics category easier to digest

WRITTEN BY Melissa Kvidahl Reilly

It’s no secret that immune health and, by association, gut health are top of mind during the COVID-19 pandemic. The good news is that it’s a trend with staying power: the U.S. digestive health supplement market is projected to grow at a CAGR of about 7% between 2021 and 2026.1

In the midst of this growth is the emergence of a burgeoning category: synbiotics, or formulations containing both live bacteria (probiotics) and compounds that feed bacteria (prebiotics). Some synbiotics are complementary, meaning the probiotics and prebiotics work independently in a formulation; others, however, are synergistic, meaning that the prebiotics are selected specifically to benefit the chosen probiotic, yielding a more significant combined benefit.

Consumers are on board, and Innova Market Insights says that globally, new synbiotic launches grew an average of 41% annually between 2016 and 2020. Why? Despite being a relatively new category, synbiotics benefit from existing consumer understanding of probiotics and prebiotics …continue reading

Husker scientists studying our ‘second brain’ — the gut microbiome

WRITTEN BY Deann Gayman

Using what they’ve learned in the laboratory, and the specialized strains of bacteria they developed, Benson and Hutkins, along with Nebraska animal scientist Tom Burkey and former Husker scientist Jens Walter, launched their own company to bring their research to the marketplace.

Synbiotic Health will provide something novel and clinically proven — a product that mixes beneficial microbes and the fiber-like fuel that feeds them — for health-conscious consumers.

Nebraska Today recently sat down for a conversation with Benson, professor of food science and director of the center, and Hutkins, Khem Shahani Distinguished Professor of Food Science, to discuss how our food choices affect our health, what sets Nebraska apart in the research of the gut microbiome, and what research will emerge following the COVID-19 pandemic …continue reading

Fermented Foods such as Kombucha are Trendy, but They’re Not Necessarily Probiotics

WRITTEN BY Carrie Dennett

Fermentation is a case of what’s old is new again — an ancient food-processing method turned hot trend, with companies churning out products incorporating kefir, kimchi, sauerkraut and kombucha that are promoted as being probiotics. But do these foods offer true probiotic benefits? The short answer is probably not. But that doesn’t mean these foods are without benefit.

First, let’s clear up what “probiotic” means. Scientists define probiotics as live microorganisms (microbes) which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit. Probiotics can contribute to digestive and immune system health and crowd out harmful microbes in the gut (large intestine). They also create some nutrients, including vitamin K and many of the B vitamins, and help our bodies absorb other nutrients. …continue reading